Posted 6 days ago
I can’t stop laughing at this.

I can’t stop laughing at this.

Posted 2 weeks ago

It’s like the "Slap Me For $5" Girl, but even better, because this is therapeutic and actually provides a basic mental health service to people that may need them!

50¢ a minute is a little low in my opinion, I’d double that rate. But still, props to this guy!

(Source: facebook.com)

Posted 2 weeks ago

I watched this documentary at a screening on Thursday and one thing that really struck me, is that when I was in Guatemala, not even the extremely poor people lived like this, in tents or in houses made out of plywood and tarps. They might’ve only been able to afford to live in concrete mazes with corrugated steel roofs held in place by rocks and twisted rebar, but I never saw anyone living in a fucking tent.

Posted 2 weeks ago

aytozelk:

Finally got my cookie dough Dunkin ☺️ so happy!

Dat cookie dough

Posted 2 weeks ago

I don’t like this expression “First World problems.” It is false and it is condescending. Yes, Nigerians struggle with floods or infant mortality. But these same Nigerians also deal with mundane and seemingly luxurious hassles. Connectivity issues on your BlackBerry, cost of car repair, how to sync your iPad, what brand of noodles to buy: Third World problems. All the silly stuff of life doesn’t disappear just because you’re black and live in a poorer country. People in the richer nations need a more robust sense of the lives being lived in the darker nations. Here’s a First World problem: the inability to see that others are as fully complex and as keen on technology and pleasure as you are.

One event that illustrated the gap between the Africa of conjecture and the real Africa was the BlackBerry outage of a few weeks ago. Who would have thought Research In Motion’s technical issues would cause so much annoyance and inconvenience in a place like Lagos? But of course it did, because people don’t wake up with “poor African” pasted on their foreheads. They live as citizens of the modern world. None of this is to deny the existence of social stratification and elite structures here. There are lifestyles of the rich and famous, sure. But the interesting thing about modern technology is how socially mobile it is—quite literally. Everyone in Lagos has a phone.

Teju Cole (via fatmanatee)

I think about this passage at least once a week. 

(via chels)
Posted 2 weeks ago

Throwback Thursday! God damn, I was so skinny. I weighed myself last week when I started going to the gym again, I’m 198 pounds now. That’s insane.

This was taken in 2007, in Cedar City, UT.

Posted 2 weeks ago

Does anyone remember that pop-up radio website that was popular in 2004 and 2005 that aggregated thousands of colorful, user-created music playlists made in Flash and hosted on users’ personal servers?

Posted 2 weeks ago

ghostsflesh:

April fools. The prank is being born into an existence that you did not choose, a monetary system you can’t escape and a body that’s dying all around you. Haha.

Posted 2 weeks ago

burn this

natashavc:

Here is the fundamental lesson of my late 20’s that I’m going to share with you before 30 hits. When it comes to friends and the things they do to hurt themselves: if there is a sincere desire to change then show up. Take the phone calls, make the time, stroke their hair as they lick their wounds. But if it’s not sincere and it’s part of their ritualized self-destruction — your caresses or your spanks allowing them enough self-loathing or penance to do the whole fucking ordeal again—then you can only do one thing: let it burn. 

Realizing this is part of becoming an adult and entering the real world. I have no comment.

Posted 2 weeks ago
We’re the first generation who has never had to defend it’s freedom, and it shows… and we’re making sure that our children and grandchildren, the ones we’re supposed to love, will be born into a world considerably less free than the one we were born into.
Pat Condell, March 13 2014
Posted 2 weeks ago
We have learned that it is pent-up feelings that are dangerous, whispered purposes that are revolutionary, covert follies that warp and poison the mind; that the wisest thing to do with a fool is to encourage him to hire a hall and discourse to his fellow citizens. Nothing chills nonsense like exposure to the air; nothing dispels folly like its publication; nothing so eases the machine as the safety valve.
Dr. Woodrow Wilson, Constitutional Government in The United States, 1908
Posted 3 weeks ago
If you run a national TV news program, you have a responsibility to stand up and be counted. It’s more than just a job: you are the gatekeeper for our free speech and our free information.
Pat Condell, March 13 2014